Mary Kubica-Don’t You Cry | Book Review

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New York Times bestselling author of The Good Girl, Mary Kubica returns with an electrifying and addictive tale of deceit and obsession 

In downtown Chicago, a young woman named Esther Vaughan disappears from her apartment without a trace. A haunting letter addressed to My Dearest is found among her possessions, leaving her friend and roommate Quinn Collins to wonder where Esther is and whether or not she’s the person Quinn thought she knew.

Meanwhile, in a small Michigan harbor town an hour outside Chicago, a mysterious woman appears in the quiet coffee shop where eighteen-year-old Alex Gallo works as a dishwasher. He is immediately drawn to her charm and beauty, but what starts as an innocent crush quickly spirals into something far more dark and sinister than he ever expected.

As Quinn searches for answers about Esther, and Alex is drawn further under Pearl’s spell, master of suspense Mary Kubica takes readers on a taut and twisted thrill ride that builds to a stunning conclusion and shows that no matter how fast and far we run, the past always catches up with us in the end

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So…I have not reviewed anything in a while, but wow, DON’T YOU CRY is something that I just could not review because it really dragged me into its world, and I still have a “hangover” over it.

Ever since I read THE GOOD GIRL, I couldn’t help but be excited for what Mary Kubica has to offer next. She’s the kind of author who knows how to pull you in with her words; who knows how to create worlds and characters that are strong, independent—and could really make you just want to read the book continuously—you have to stop yourself before you consume it right away.

Anyway, DON’T YOU CRY was definitely that book—and more. It starts off with the whole premise of obsession: Quinn being obsessed with finding her roommate, Esther, and Alex being obsessed with the new girl in town whom he called “Pearl”. It revolves around the premise of not really knowing who you have around you—even when you think you do.

Ask yourself: Do you really know your friends? What about the people who live at home with you—how much do you actually know about them? Well, this book will allow you to ponder on those questions—and realize that there is so much more to people than what you see.

Old town legends—and stories about people you think you know—also envelop this story. From Alex thinking that he knows the legends of his small town, to Quinn thinking that she knows—or is close to knowing—what happened to the woman who used to live in her room with Esther. From truths that are merely lies covering themselves up, to the exact truths that people fail to see—this book is surely full of those.

Another thing about this book is love. There are all kinds of it. Motherly love. Obsessive Love. Love that one can be unsure of. Love that you don’t even know if it’s actually love. This book shows just how love could affect people’s lives—whether in a positive or negative manner; how corrupted one’s mind can get when he blinds himself with love—or the lack thereof.

With allusions to SINGLE WHITE FEMALE, which is actually one of my favorite movies of all time, this book had all the right twists and turns that will make you gasp and leave you in awe. Speaking of that movie, I was around 8 or 9 when I first saw it—and I still couldn’t forget it. In fact, it’s probably one of the reasons why I like the whole crime/suspense-thriller genre. And this book, I’m telling you, is full of that.

Another thing that I like? It’s the fact that though I had some close guesses, Kubica was still able to surprise me with what happened in the book—and why exactly it happened. It was so surprising and crazy that it really broke and affected me at some point.

With various twists, and crazy turns, there’s something this book will help you realize and it is this: You never really know what’s going on around you. And the people you think you know? Well, there are certain stories they may be keeping inside—and one day, they could blow up to the surface.

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